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Maricopa County Parks and Recreation

Fire Ban vs No Burn Day

Who issues a fire ban?

  • A fire ban is initiated in Maricopa County's regional parks by the Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Department.  This is done to limit the possibility of starting a brush fire, which could cause serious damage to the parks.  The fire ban includes the use of campfires, fire pits and charcoal grills; however, it is still acceptable to use gas/propane grills in designated areas such as the ramada areas, semi-developed and developed camping sites. Park visitors who in violation of this park rule, Rule 113, may be cited.

  • Where will fire ban information be posted? Fire ban information will be posted in the teal banner at the top of every page on the maricopacountyparks.net website.

What is a temporary fire ban?

  • Park supervisors have been authorized to issue temporary fire bans when a full-fledged fire ban is not in place to ensure public safety and protect the parks resources. When temporary fire bans are issued, information will be posted on the website, and park visitors will be notified as they enter the park.
  • Where will temporary fire ban information be posted? The parks may post the information on their respective park home pages on the website, on the park's Facebook pages, and throughout the park. If/when possible, staff and park volunteers may visit park visitors in the campgrounds to alert and/or update them on the temporary fire ban.

Who issues a No Burn Day?

  • When air pollution levels are on the rise and weather conditions create dry, stagnant air, the Maricopa County Air Quality Department and/or Arizona Department of Environmental Quality will issue a “No Burn Day.” Restrictions last for a 24-hour period, starting at midnight, and include a ban on woodburning activity including fireplaces, fire pits or open outdoor fires. Depending on the status of air quality, restrictions will change, so be sure to take note of the differences. “High Pollution Advisory,” or “HPA,” means the highest concentration of pollution may exceed the federal health standard. 
  • Where can I find No Burn Day alerts. The department recommends that park visitors visit the following websites for information and updates on No Burn Days:

What are the different types of No Burn Day restrictions?

  • Ozone High Pollution Advisory*: Ground level ozone is formed by a chemical reaction that needs heat from sunlight, nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to form. The months of April through September make up our Valley’s longer-than-normal “ozone season.”

    • Employees and contractors of government entities are prohibited from operating leaf blowers.

    • Woodburning in residential fireplaces, chimineas, outdoor fire pits and similar outdoor fires is not allowed.
  • PM-10 High Pollution Advisory*: PM-10 (sometimes referred to as PM10) is coarse particulate matter less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are generally emitted from sources such as vehicles traveling on unpaved roads, materials handling, and crushing and grinding operations, as well as windblown dust.
    • Employees and contractors of government entities are prohibited from operating leaf blowers.
    • Woodburning in residential fireplaces, chimineas, outdoor fire pits and similar outdoor fires is not allowed.
    • Off-Highway Vehicles (OHVs) being used in Area A is not allowed.
  • PM-10 or PM-2.5 Health Watch: Woodburning in residential fireplaces, chimineas, outdoor fire pits and similar outdoor fires is not allowed.

*During High Pollution Advisories, it is permissible to cook with charcoal when it is being done for immediate consumption. Fires must be extinguished once the meal has been cooked.

 
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